STORYTELLING IN HIGHER EDUCATION
141
understands
.
21
I will tell you a story so that you will understand.
III. The Interdisciplinary Nature of the Law
Many moons ago, there lived a spider
.
22
She was newly drifted to the world
and did not yet know its ways. She came to land upon a great solid stone
and found an old spider there who had made it his home. The old spider
welcomed her and offered to teach her the mysteries of weaving
.
23
For a
21 See M
ATTHEW
P. G
ALLETS
, S
TORYTELLING AND
S
TORY
R
EADING
: A C
OMPARISON
OF
E
FFECTS ON
C
HILDREN
S
M
EMORY AND
S
TORY
C
OMPREHENSION
(2005)
(
)
.
22 Why, oh why, would I compare lawyers to spiders? Don’t we already have a bad enough
reputation? I admit, I was reluctant to relate myself to a venomous, blood-sucking
creature that ranks among the most prevalent of phobia subjects. However, the parallel
was too good to resist. Firstly, because, let’s face it, that is how society loves to portray
us — as a bunch of blood-sucking monsters that prey on people when they are most
vulnerable. I couldn’t resist taking the jab! Secondly, because spiders, like lawyers,
provide a valuable service: destroying pests. That they feed on these problems in
destroying them is only fair; all things must survive. We may not trust them, but we
should acknowledge that they really do make our world a better place. So, the next
time you spy a spider making its home in a corner of your room, I think a “thank you” is
in order. Thirdly, webs are an incredibly powerful symbol used by cultures around the
world to evoke magic, unity, a twining of different worlds together, or a link between
past and future.
23 While each tribe has its own aesthetic, the significance of the tradition of weaving is
shared by many Native American cultures. One popular symbol is the
,
which are thought to have originated in the Ojibwa Nation. In Ojibwe, they are called
asabikeshiinh, which is the inanimate form of the word for “spider.” Spiders are also
powerful symbols in Native American lore. In Navajo culture, the Spider Woman taught
women to weave. The Pueblo Indians honored her as the core of creation. The Lakota
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