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KAREN D. BOYD & WADE LIVINGSTON
ducive to learning
.
46
Facilitator Model courses are: (a) commit to a Facili-
tator Philosophy and grounds it in the course’s learning objectives; (b) un-
shakeably focus on students; (c) align policies and programs to encourage
ethical action; (d) build an environment that fosters ethical development
and moral reasoning; (e) be aware of and consistently seeking to improve
on its weaknesses; and (f) share the responsibility with students to achieve
all of the above. In effect, a college, or course, that embraces the Facilitator
Model becomes a Deep Learning institution, albeit for personal and social
responsibility education.
Facilitator Philosophy
The first step in building a relationship conducive to ethical development
and the acquisition of legal knowledge is for faculty to adopt and instill in
their students the Facilitator Philosophy. Professionals functioning from a
Facilitator Philosophy share with students mutual responsibility for meeting
reasonable expectations of student safety and ethical conduct, while har-
nessing the power of the SIR to actively encourage, exert influence, and
foster student behaviors that meet these expectations. Faculty role model
the power of the SIR in the classroom through teaching.
For example, on the first day of class, faculty introduce students to the
Facilitator Philosophy, expected learning outcomes, a visual of the SIR
which illustrates the dynamic relationship between different institutional
constituent groups (students, faculty, administrators, alumni, parents, law-
makers, etc.), and a visual that describes how those groups influenced the
nature of college’s SIR. Sharing this guiding philosophical framework chal-
46 G
EORGE
D. K
UH
et al.
,
S
S
C
: C
C
T
HAT
M
(2005).
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