32
WILLIAM A. KAPLIN
courts: Law must be “uniform,” except when the uniformity becomes “uni-
formity of oppression;” the law must be “impartial;” there “must be nothing
[in the law] that savors of prejudice or favor or even arbitrary whim or fit-
fulness.
7
Breaking justice into sub-sets such as these, to fit the circum-
stances of the matter being addressed, can help lawyers, policymakers,
and others to identify, explain, and resolve the particular injustice being
confronted.
VII. Closing Perspective
This brief personal essay has not presented any grand or global theory
of justice; nor has it presented any comprehensive description or account
of justice and its relationship to law. The concepts of law and justice re-
main just as contested as they have been, and justice remains an inher-
ently vague term. But this essay does provide a glimpse of how Bob Bickel
thinks about and feels about law and social justice. And this essay also
presents various ways for others to think about law and justice; suggests
why it is important for lawyers, policymakers, and others to keep social
justice in the forefront, not the backwaters, of their thinking; and may thus
provide some guidance (and hopefully some motivation) for those who may
wish to address an issue of injustice. So I end where I began: social jus-
tice means empowering those who are powerless, lifting up those who are
down-trodden or marginalized, respecting the dignity and humanity of all
persons and recognizing their membership in the human family, and work-
ing for equality for individuals and groups that have been deprived of equal-
ity.
7 B
ENJAMIN
C
ARDOZO
,
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HE
N
J
P
112–13 (1921).
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